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How to take great photos—even on your cell phone

TED Blog

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Taking great photos isn’t just about having a nice camera. I’m a firm believer that good photography comes from smart photographers who think creatively and know how to make the most of what they’ve got—whether they’re working with fancy DSLR or an iPhone.

On TED’s design team, where I manage TED’s Instagram account, we’re always on the lookout for beautiful, arresting images. Below are 8 non-technical, non-intimidating tips that I continue to refer to even after years of taking pictures.

  1. Keep your lens clean and your battery charged. Yes, both of these things are obvious, but they’re also very easy to forget. With my camera, I like to keep at least one extra fully-charged battery on hand, and I always keep my phone charger with me because it’s such a bummer when you want to take a photo but can’t. Phones can get especially dirty from riding around in…

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Day break

It’s five a.m in the morning and thousand stories are circulating in my mind.
I can hear morning prayers from far. I wonder how disciplined the lives of these people are. If their unflinching faith makes their day better than others? Or is it an act that purifies their soul like brushing cleans the teeth?
A Van Gogh picture of a mother bent down with her baby refuses to leave my mind, tucked away somewhere in my sub consciousness, the colors……mustard, shades of brown, line drawings and patterns in the background. Passion of Van Gogh.
There is something new to an early morning, like an unknown place we travel to on a holiday. Never knew waking up early would be similar to a spiritual experience!

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thanks, mr. jobs.

ACURIOUSWORLD

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‘Thank you, Steve Jobs.’

God, I never thought I would say those words.

For decades, I have been bothinfuriated and seduced by the man;alternating between curious and angry, enamored and resentful. I idolized and villainized him. His products have both helped and hijacked my career and personal life – devouring my time, my attention and my bank account. For all of his grand invention, he was at the core just a ‘dealer’, feeding society’s ‘more, please, now’addiction. By blurringtechnologies withtoys, he hooked billionswith a ‘shiny new, faster, more colorful’ lure.

Ironically, he consideredhimself Buddhist but mastermindedproducts that disconnect us from our minds instead of settling us deeper into them.

Like many, I grew tired of his rhetoric and bravado, his secrets and sweatshops. But when I watched the now famous 60 minutes interviewwhere he rejected his birth father as a mere sperm bank – and vowed to never meet the…

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